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HRH Princess Anne visits Harewood ahead of ‘Royal Harewood’ exhibition launch

HRH Princess Anne visited Harewood today ahead of our new exhibition season… The Princess was greeted by Lord and Lady Harewood, Harewood Chief Executive Mike Schafer and Harewood House Staff. Presented with one of Harewood’s new roses, Rosa ‘Yorkshire Princess’ the Princess toured the exhibitions on the State Floor, ‘Royal Harewood: Celebrating the Life of the Yorkshire Princess‘, as well as our temporary exhibition in the Terrace Gallery ‘Marcus Adams: Royal Photogrpaher‘…

Royal Harewood - Portrait

Celebrating the Life of The Yorkshire Princess

Harewood was home to HRH Princess Mary, The Princess Royal, through four decades. Her love of Yorkshire and the affection the people of Yorkshire felt for her in return mean that she will always be remembered as ‘The Yorkshire Princess’.

Princess Mary married Henry, 6th Earl of Harewood in 1922 and they moved into Harewood House in 1929. They were avid collectors and, with the generous help of the Heritage Lottery Fund, we will be displaying for the first time many of the things that were precious to her: personal items such as exquisite fans, gifts from heads of state, presents from her royal relations by the great designer Fabergé. These displays provide a glimpse into the life and loves of a very ‘Yorkshire Princess’.

Marcus Adams: Royal Photographer

Exhibition - Marcus Adams Royal Photographer - The Queen Princess Anne and Prince Charles

In the Terrace Gallery a special collection of photographs taken by favourite royal photographer Marcus Adams, and generously lent by The Queen from The Royal Collection, capture with wonderful charm the young Princess Elizabeth, life as the new royal family, the pre-war years and then later a new generation of royals; Prince Charles and Princess Anne. Don’t miss the opportunity to see these striking, fun, informal and vibrant photographs.

Visit the House this season and round your visit off with a delicious cream tea in the Terrace Café! Marcus Adams exhibition open until Sunday 17 June, and Royal Harewood: Celebrating the Life of the Yorkshire Princess runs until 30 Sept.

Click here to visit our exhibitions pages

 

Uncovering the past: Gawthorpe Hall Dig at Harewood

Student archaeologists on trail of Yorkshire gem’s hidden past

Gawthorpe Dig with York University Archaeology Department - gawthorpe old drawing

Archaeologists from the University of York are revealing intriguing traces — hidden for more than two centuries — of the forerunner of one of Yorkshire’s great country houses.

In the shadow of Harewood House, a team of undergraduate students is carrying out the painstaking task of unearthing the remnants of Harewood’s predecessor, Gawthorpe Hall, which was demolished in 1773.

After carrying out exploratory digs and geophysical surveys over the last two years, the student archaeologists are spending three weeks uncovering the layout of the Hall of which only two contemporary illustrations survive.

Education sessions will allow school groups to explore the excavation, get their hands dirty digging and talk to the archaeologists. Workshops, lectures and public tours of the dig as well as exhibits of finds will be a feature of Harewood’s Medieval Festival on 16th and 17th July. You’ll also find out more about Harewood All Saints’ Church (founded in 1116), the 12th century Castle and medieval village of ‘Harwood’ [then spelt without an ‘e’]. Visit our Medieval Festival event webpage for details.

Gawthorpe Dig 2011 - finds

The archaeologists have already discovered a wealth of artefacts including a coin dating from the early 15th century, an 18th century chamber pot, decorative glassware and wine bottle fragments, decorative pins and a thimble as well as a range of ceramics from the medieval period up to the 18th century, which will help us to tell the story of how the family lived, how the hall was decorated and much more besides. The students have also unearthed a flint arrowhead dating back to pre-history.

Dr Finch said: “As well as providing a much longer history of Harewood that stretches thousands of years back into prehistory, the archaeology will give us a unique insight into the impact the Caribbean sugar industry and slavery had, not just on the fortunes of the Lascelles family, but on English landscape and society as a whole over two hundred years ago.”

Gawthorpe Dig 2011

David Lascelles said: “So much of what we know of Harewood’s history focuses on Harewood House and who has lived there. The excavation being done by York University students is helping to fill some of the gaps of that earlier history and – we all hope – answer some of the questions about Gawthorpe. We’ll be re-creating medieval Harewood in a digital “fly-by” to be shown as part of our Medieval Festival event in July, revealing a landscape without Harewood House and before Capability Brown’s intervention.”

Dr Finch headed a team from the University of York which travelled to Barbados last month to investigate the old Lascelles plantations, some of which still operate as sugar plantations with historic houses and factory buildings still surviving. Artefacts discovered there will be added to those found at Gawthorpe to create a new teaching resource based in Barbados and Yorkshire.

Education Sessions for Schools

Bookable education sessions will allow school groups to explore the excavation, get their hands dirty digging and talk to the archaeologists. Contact our Learning department for details on 0113 218 1043 or email.

To read more about our upcoming Medieval Festival, visit our What’s On pages here.

University of York logo

For more information about the University of York’s Department of Archaeology visit their website here…

You can also visit the dig to see the archaeology in action. Click here to read more…

Keep up with the progress of the archaeology team on their blog or facebook
You can see finds from the Dig in the Terrace Gallery as part of our Summer exhibitions programme. Click here to read more…

This summer, explore Medieval Harewood with us…

Find out more on our Medieval Harewood webpages…

The proof is in the tasting… A new Ale for Harewood made from our very own hops!

Harewood Gold made from Harewood Hops

If you follow the path around the Lakeside at Harewood, you’ll come to the Walled Garden, the oldest garden at Harewood. It was already under construction when building at Harewood House began in 1759. Its purpose was to provide the kitchens there with the finest fresh fruit and vegetables.

Horticultural skills of the very highest standard were nurtured there; new and exotic plants and food crops were introduced and specially designed buildings made to grow them in. It was extensively refurbished in the 1930s, with modern glasshouses replacing most of the old hothouses.

Today the Walled Garden is still a working kitchen garden growing a wide variety of both heritage and modern varieties of fruit and vegetables as well as several varieties of hops…

The Walled Garden is enclosed by old red brick walls, built at great expense, as brick wasn’t as cheap as stone, but prized for its heat retaining properties. Hop growing is a classic use of these walls – 7 different varieties grow here including Fuggle, Mathon and Whitbread’s Goldings Variety. 

Wharfebank’s Martin Kellaway & Harewood Head Gardener Trevor Nicholson

These hops are now hand-picked by staff and volunteers every September, reviving a tradition to produce Harewood’s own modern brew of bitter and pale ale. 

Harewood’s new Ale will be available this winter and throughout the year in 2012 to purchase from the Courtyard Shop.

Look out for our Harewood Gold event next September… ‘Harewood Gold: From Hops to Ale’

Find out more on our Gardens Webpages… http://www.harewood.org/grounds/gardens