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Dining at its Finest at Harewood…

Harewood House and The Box Tree Join Forces for Michelin Star Fine Dining

Mike Schafer, Chief Executive of Harewood House, announced today that The Box Tree Restaurant will head up Harewood’s ‘Fine Dining in the House’.

The Box Tree at Harewood

Rena and Simon Gueller, who own and manage Box Tree Events were welcomed by David Lascelles, the Earl of Harewood and Mike Schafer, on the State Floor of Harewood House where they will provide a variety of fine dining options for private and corporate clients.

Mike Schafer, CEO said: ‘Our corporate hospitality is a major element within our offer and we only want to work with the best.  We have some of the finest architecture and interiors in the country and our hospitality needs to compliment our environment.  We are delighted to appoint Rena and Simon to manage our fine dining, and as a multi-award winning and Michelin Starred Restaurant, The Box Tree is held in the highest regard in the culinary world – their service, menus and wines are revered, not just regionally but also nationally.  Working with The Box Tree team means we are confident that every event at Harewood will be of the highest standard and we look forward to welcoming existing and new clients to Harewood for hospitality beyond all expectations.’

Menus for Harewood will be created by Simon Gueller of The Box Tree Restaurant, one of the country’s leading chefs and a Michelin Star winner for an unprecedented 8 consecutive years.

Simon’s menus for Harewood will combine French classics with modern English served within the grandeur of the State Floor, the unique Below Stairs and on the Terrace overlooking some of the finest views in Yorkshire.

Simon Gueller added: ‘Harewood and The Box Tree will be one of the UK’s premier destinations for superior hospitality.  Harewood hosts a variety of guests, from Monarchs to Heads of State and we will ensure that every client is treated as such.   Corporate clients expect the best at Harewood and we will work hard to ensure that every event, small or large, formal or informal, sets a benchmark in fine dining.’

Click here to read more about Fine Dining in the House at Harewood…

Harewood Champion Trees!

In the UK our wonderful tree heritage is recorded within the Tree Register, a Registered Charity with a unique database of over 150,000 of our most notable Trees.

Recording a veteran oak tree in the grounds of Harewood House

Harewood’s trees are a beautiful and important feature of the landscape which surrounds the House. Following our latest Tree Register Report we can now say we are home to several Champion Trees!

We have a Grand Fir growing in the Lakeside Gardens (SE of the Cascade beside the path towards the Walled Garden) which has been recorded as the tallest in Yorkshire. It is the best the Tree Inspector has ever seen and looks as if it wants to grow a bit taller too!

We also have a rare Japanese oak (planted by Her Majesty Queen Alexandra on 8th July 1908) in the grounds; it is certainly a champion tree for Yorkshire and maybe a Champion Tree for the whole of the British Isles, we’ll wait for final confirmation and update the post here!

Several other trees become County Champions for Yorkshire including:

  • Grecian Fir in the West Garden
  • Purple Bean Tree south of the Cascade, by the Stupa
  • Katsura Tree in the Himalayan Garden
  • Leylandii south of the Lake, near the large Sessile Oak
  • Eucryphia in the Archery Border which is remarkably large for Yorkshire!
  • Japanese Big-leaved Magnolia in the Himalayan Garden
  • London Plane in the Bird Garden
  • Japanese Cherry beside the path to the Church
  • Scarlet Oak on the North Front opposite the House
  • Daimyo Oak on the North Front opposite the House

Please note: some trees pictured below are not in areas currently accessible to visitors. Please stay to the marked footpaths and access areas when you visit Harewood.

Estimating the age of a large conifer
Gathering data for the tree register of two ancient oaks four to five centuries old
Measuring the girth of an old ash tree
Recording details of a veteran oak tree at Harewood
Using a hypsometer to measure the height of a tree

Please note: some trees pictured above are not in areas currently accessible to visitors. Please stay to the marked footpaths and access areas when you visit Harewood.

The Scarlet Oak on the North Front is exceeded only by a few in southern England, and the Dawn Redwood south of the lake is a particularly beautiful tree and almost the tallest this far north.

One of our Rhododendronsto the south of the lake is the largest hardy hybrid of any kind the Tree Register Inspector had ever seen!

Harewood is a wonderful place to explore the landscape and spot some of these wonderful trees… A new walks booklet is available from the Harewood Information Centre which will take you on 4 walks of discovery in the Grounds at Harewood…and we hope to produce something similar focussing on the trees at Harewood…watch this space for details!

You can collect a guide to some of the wonderful trees in the West Garden at Harewood during Autumn Glory week (October Half Term) – the trees are at their most colourful and vivid at this time of year…

Read more about the Grounds at Harewood and our Autumn Glory event on our website…

Four walks to explore Harewood…

Long walks, short walks, dog walks, bluebell walks, walks in the rain, walks in the snow… the landscape at Harewood has all these walks and more…

A new walks booklet is now available to purchase from the Information Centre, Bookshop or House Desk at Harewood, with routes to discover more about this ancient landscape…

And a new guidebook written by David Lascelles, Lord Harewood with an updated history including new information we have learnt in recent years is available to buy at the House Desk, Information Centre and Bookshop.

Ask at the Information Centre next time you visit Harewood! Click here to see our opening times and prices…

Uncovering the past: Gawthorpe Hall Dig at Harewood

Student archaeologists on trail of Yorkshire gem’s hidden past

Gawthorpe Dig with York University Archaeology Department - gawthorpe old drawing

Archaeologists from the University of York are revealing intriguing traces — hidden for more than two centuries — of the forerunner of one of Yorkshire’s great country houses.

In the shadow of Harewood House, a team of undergraduate students is carrying out the painstaking task of unearthing the remnants of Harewood’s predecessor, Gawthorpe Hall, which was demolished in 1773.

After carrying out exploratory digs and geophysical surveys over the last two years, the student archaeologists are spending three weeks uncovering the layout of the Hall of which only two contemporary illustrations survive.

Education sessions will allow school groups to explore the excavation, get their hands dirty digging and talk to the archaeologists. Workshops, lectures and public tours of the dig as well as exhibits of finds will be a feature of Harewood’s Medieval Festival on 16th and 17th July. You’ll also find out more about Harewood All Saints’ Church (founded in 1116), the 12th century Castle and medieval village of ‘Harwood’ [then spelt without an ‘e’]. Visit our Medieval Festival event webpage for details.

Gawthorpe Dig 2011 - finds

The archaeologists have already discovered a wealth of artefacts including a coin dating from the early 15th century, an 18th century chamber pot, decorative glassware and wine bottle fragments, decorative pins and a thimble as well as a range of ceramics from the medieval period up to the 18th century, which will help us to tell the story of how the family lived, how the hall was decorated and much more besides. The students have also unearthed a flint arrowhead dating back to pre-history.

Dr Finch said: “As well as providing a much longer history of Harewood that stretches thousands of years back into prehistory, the archaeology will give us a unique insight into the impact the Caribbean sugar industry and slavery had, not just on the fortunes of the Lascelles family, but on English landscape and society as a whole over two hundred years ago.”

Gawthorpe Dig 2011

David Lascelles said: “So much of what we know of Harewood’s history focuses on Harewood House and who has lived there. The excavation being done by York University students is helping to fill some of the gaps of that earlier history and – we all hope – answer some of the questions about Gawthorpe. We’ll be re-creating medieval Harewood in a digital “fly-by” to be shown as part of our Medieval Festival event in July, revealing a landscape without Harewood House and before Capability Brown’s intervention.”

Dr Finch headed a team from the University of York which travelled to Barbados last month to investigate the old Lascelles plantations, some of which still operate as sugar plantations with historic houses and factory buildings still surviving. Artefacts discovered there will be added to those found at Gawthorpe to create a new teaching resource based in Barbados and Yorkshire.

Education Sessions for Schools

Bookable education sessions will allow school groups to explore the excavation, get their hands dirty digging and talk to the archaeologists. Contact our Learning department for details on 0113 218 1043 or email.

To read more about our upcoming Medieval Festival, visit our What’s On pages here.

University of York logo

For more information about the University of York’s Department of Archaeology visit their website here…

You can also visit the dig to see the archaeology in action. Click here to read more…

Keep up with the progress of the archaeology team on their blog or facebook
You can see finds from the Dig in the Terrace Gallery as part of our Summer exhibitions programme. Click here to read more…

This summer, explore Medieval Harewood with us…

Find out more on our Medieval Harewood webpages…