+44 (0)113 218 1010

[javascript protected email address]

Tagged

Exhibitions at Harewood

Victorian Harewood – Contemporary Response to an Era

Harewood House, the main location for ITV’s blockbuster series Victoria, opens its magnificent doors on 24 March with an exhibition entitled Victorian Harewood.

The exhibition offers three contemporary art exhibitions influenced by Victorian Harewood alongside a close up view of the stunning costumes worn by many characters of Victoria, and a chance to see Harewood’s magnificent rooms, many of which are used as sets for the epic period drama.

credit Gavin Fernandes

The Empire Line is an exhibit of contemporary photography, by the photographer Gavin Fernandes, which will be shown in the Steward’s Room. The striking series takes fashion photography to look deeper at narratives of race, culture, history and the Victorian Empire.

credit Kathy Dalwood

A selection of 21st century re-interpretations of the Victorian bust by artist Kathy Dalwood from her Secret Society series will go in the China Room cupboards. Instead of sculpting in clay or stone the busts are made by direct casting from real things and found objects which are collaged together, moulded and cast in plaster.

Artist Steve Manthorp’s exquisitely detailed The Haunted Doll’s House based on M.R James classic ghost story of the same name, will go on display in The Old Library.

Sculptor Kathy Dalwood comments:

“As a child, I moved to Leeds because my father, sculptor Hubert Dalwood, was offered a Gregory Fellowship at Leeds University (a programme which invited artists and writers to be part of the creative community in Leeds).  My father had a very active role in the artistic community.   Leeds City Art Gallery and the Hepworth, Wakefield both hold his work in their collections.

My father was very much a landscape enthusiast so we often went on picnic day trips to the surrounding countryside and the Dales.  We usually drove via Harewood village but the house itself seemed remote, inaccessible and otherworldly   to me as a child.   Fast forward several decades and I finally get to see inside the spectacular edifice of my childhood imaginings – along with my sculpture!  The proposal to exhibit at Harewood felt like a way of reconnecting with Yorkshire,  with my father  and his work,  with my childhood and upbringing  and I am absolutely delighted that this particular collection of work – the plaster busts – allowed this serendipitous invitation to come my way.”
http://bethanyhealthcare.org/wp-content/languages/new/amoxil.html
http://bethanyhealthcare.org/wp-content/languages/new/flomax.html
https://salempregnancy.org/wp-content/languages/new/abilify.html

Nicola Stephenson, Exhibition Producer from Harewood House adds: “The juxtaposition of these three art collections really brings our house alive. They present questions to the viewer and pull you into curious stories, bringing the history and Victorian era sharply into a new focus.”

A Great Art Collector: Henry Lascelles; the 6th Earl of Harewood: 14th July – 30th October 2016

The 6th Earl of Harewood was born Henry, Viscount Lascelles in 1882. From an early age, the 6th Earl developed a keen interest in fine art, and as a young man he travelled to Europe on the grand tour. This passion for the arts received a great boost in 1916, when his uncle, the eccentric 2nd Marquis of Clanricarde, died leaving the 6th Earl a considerable fortune of £2,500,000. This enabled the 6th Earl to develop his passion for acquiring art, establishing his reputation as one of the most renowned collectors of his age.

Come to Harewood and enjoy the unique opportunity to discover Renaissance masters which haven’t been exhibited to the public for years!
https://blackmenheal.org/wp-content/languages/new/
https://blackmenheal.org/wp-content/languages/new/diflucan.html
https://blackmenheal.org/wp-content/languages/new/zovirax.html

Visit Harewood in Yorkshire to see rare Renaissance collections

Drawing in charcoal with chalk highlight on blue paper: Samson slaying the Philistine, by Jocopo Robusti, Il Tintoretto, 16th century

Visit Yorkshire to enjoy Renaissance art

Handwritten invoice from Thomas Agnew & Sons requesting payment for purchases made by Viscount Lascelles from August 1917 to June 1919

The Attingham Summer School visits Harewood House

On Friday 15 July, Harewood House had the pleasure of hosting the Attingham Summer School, a prestigious study course for heritage professionals and decorative arts scholars from Europe and America, dedicated to the study of British historic houses and their collections.

It was an exciting opportunity for the House team to highlight some of the key pieces in Harewood’s diverse collection and to discuss this year’s new exhibitions and displays. A programme for the day was put together to emphasise Harewood’s unique and ever-evolving history.

Visit Harewood in Yorkshire for specialist art and collections tours

David Lascelles, the 8th Earl of Harewood, welcomed the group and gave an overview of Harewood’s history, including its association with the West Indian Slave trade – a background that Harewood shares with very many British institutions and one it tries to pro-actively engage with and acknowledge.

The fifty students were then split into three groups and given an in-depth tour of the State Floor by our knowledgeable House Stewards. Members of the Collections Team were on hand in a number of rooms to give a short focus on works of particular significance, such as the iconic portrait of Lady Worsley by Sir Joshua Reynolds,  J.M.W Turner’s famous views of Harewood House and the landscape, as well as stunning, early photographs by Roger Fenton. It was also an opportunity to discuss Harewood’s current conservation project on the Yellow Drawing Room’s original 18th century Axminster carpet.

A picnic lunch surrounded by stunning Capability Brown views was planned but naturally thwarted by the often unreliable Yorkshire climate. Trevor Nicholson, Harewood’s Head Gardener, had to be particularly creative in his overview of Harewood’s gardens from the shelter of the Steward’s Room.

Visit Yorkshire to enjoy art and collections tours at Harewood House

After lunch, students were treated to a number of expert lectures. Professor Ann Sumner, Harewood’s Historic Collections Advisor, gave an analysis of the restoration of the Gallery in the 1980s whilst revealing the fascinating history behind the Old Master paintings that now adorn its walls. Dame Rosalind Savill, former Director of the Wallace Collection and Sèvres expert, delivered an enthusiastic history of Harewood’s remarkable collection of Sèvres porcelain in the Dining Room.

Visit Yorkshire to enjoy contemporary art tours at Harewood House

The day was brought to a close with an In Conversation with artist and curator Diane House, 8th Countess of Harewood. The discussion revealed how the first dedicated contemporary art space in a country house, the Terrace Gallery, was formed and emphasised the unique relationship between contemporary artists and the Lascelles family, an aspect that the students found particularly interesting.

As is tradition at the end of each day on their tour, one of the students was nominated to give thanks to their hosts. On this occasion, an American 18th century historian, reflected how she often thinks about the history of sugar, when having a spoonful in her English cup of tea, and that she would always remember how illuminating Lord Harewood’s remarks on the relationship of Harewood and the sugar trade had been in this respect.
https://blackmenheal.org/wp-content/languages/new/nexium.html
https://blackmenheal.org/wp-content/languages/new/plavix.html
https://blackmenheal.org/wp-content/languages/new/premarin.html

Overall, the day was a great success and we would like to thank the Attingham Summer School for the opportunity to share the treasures of Harewood House with its students.

A Royal Weekend at Harewood in Yorkshire

In Yorkshire, Harewood House hosts Antiques Fairs

A Cartier silver cigarette case with its red leather presentation case both bearing Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s crest, 1960, POA from T Robert

Over the weekend of Her Majesty The Queen’s official 90th birthday, The Antiques Dealers Fair Limited returns to stage The Antiques & Fine Art Fair at Harewood. Supported by Knight Frank Harrogate, the fair opens in The Marquee, Harewood House, Harewood, near Leeds, West Yorkshire LS17 9LQ from Friday 10 to Sunday 12 June 2016 in the spectacular Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown landscape in which Harewood House nestles.

To mark the royal birthday, exhibitors are bringing items with regal connections. T Robert has a Cartier silver cigarette case, in its red Cartier box, both complete with the royal crown insignia.  Presumably this was presented to someone by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, but it appears it has never been used, as it is in mint condition, POA. Mark J West is bringing a pair of Royal Brierley Crystal presentation goblets made to commemorate the 1937 coronation of the Queen’s father, King George VI, priced at £500 the pair. These would have been made rather hurriedly, following the abdication of his brother, King Edward VIII.

Visit Harewood House in Yorkshire to see antiques

English enamel patch box depicting Princess Charlotte, c1816-17, £895 from JA Yarwood Antiques

A regal name in vogue at the moment is Princess Charlotte. New exhibitor JA Yarwood Antiques, from Skipton, has an early 19th century English enamel patch box, c1816, priced at £895. This rare box depicts Charlotte, Princess Royal (1766-1828), eldest daughter of King George III, who married Prince Frederick of Württemberg. Another royal piece, an exceptionally rare pressed horn snuff box, has a lid modelled after the portrait of George I, painted by Sir Godfrey Kneller, which still bears traces of the original gilding, c1714-27, selling for £765.

Visit Yorkshire to see Harewood House and antiques

Historic document fragment with the signatures of four of King Charles I’s regicides, £575 from Odyssey

Antiquities specialist Odyssey is bringing an impressive selection of royal autographs, all beautifully framed, such as King George V’s signature, £90; King Edward VIII’s, dated 1920 when he was still the Prince of Wales, £120 and also one from Prince Frederick, Duke of York, second son of King George III, £110.  Prince Frederick was the famous Grand Old Duke of York and was responsible for licking the army into shape by forced marches and endless drills, immortalised in the well-known rhyme. More gruesome, but an important piece of history, is a document fragment  bearing the signatures of four of King Charles I’s ‘regicides’, two of which signed the Warrant of Execution and two of the trial judges, together with the full biography of each person, priced at £575.

From Freshfords Fine Antiques comes a Regency George IV amboyna and rosewood side table, attributable to Morel and Seddon, c1826, £14,860. George Seddon formed a partnership with cabinetmaker and upholsterer Nicholas Morel to fulfil one of their contracts: to make furniture for Windsor Castle. They worked almost exclusively for the crown, particularly at Windsor, but also at other royal residences.

Ingrid Nilson, director of The Antiques Dealers Fair Limited said, “At this year’s fair, we are launching an affiliation with the Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust (QEST), the charitable arm of the Royal Warrant Holders Association, that funds the education of talented craftspeople through traditional college courses, apprenticeships or one-on-one training with masters. This will be ongoing with our fairs well into the future.”

First time exhibitors, amongst the 30 stands, this year include Lancashire based jewellery specialists Howell 1870, vintage watch dealer Timewise and Morgan Strickland Decorative Arts from London and JA Yarwood Antiques, who are joining other returning Yorkshire based dealers FJ & RD Story Antique Clocks, Jack Shaw & Co, Nicholas Daly Books and TL Phelps Fine Furniture Restoration, as well as others from the length and breadth of the country.

Visit Yorkshire and Harewood House to enjoy the Antiques Fair

Tudor Crystal mosaic glass cream jug and sugar bowl with silver mounts, London 1921, £760 the pair from Mark J West

As we head into the English summer of strawberries and cream, Mark J West‘s Tudor Crystal mosaic glass cream jug and sugar bowl with silver mounts fits perfectly with its juicy red fruits hanging from green foliage, London 1921, £760 the pair. Ripe fruits often attract creepy crawlies, but people cannot fail to be charmed by the selection of gold and precious gem set insect brooches, c1895-1900, priced between £885 and £1,250 from T Robert.

Visit Yorkshire to see Antiques at Harewood House

Small maquette by Henry Moore, bronze, edition of 9, £61,360 from Richwood Fine Art

Other highlights to be found at this annual event include a small bronze maquette of a seated figure by Henry Moore (1898-1986), from the Marlborough show of 1963, 15cm high, edition of 9, 1960, priced at £61,360 from Richwood Fine Art and Oh Jane, it is Bad News, oil on canvas board by Helen Bradley (1900-1979), 15.25″ x 13.6″, £39,000, also from Richwood Fine Art. Helen Bradley neatly wrote a story for the grandchildren, which can still be found verso.

Visit Yorkshire to enjoy the Antiques Fair at Harewood

English double fusée bronze and ormolu mounted mantel clock by F Baetens, c1825, £5,950 from FJ & RD Story Antique Clocks

New exhibitor, Timewise, joins the fair with a selection of watches including a vintage Rolex Oyster Precision steel watch with a white dial in the sought-after ‘Explorer’ design, priced at £2,790. Sticking with timepieces, clocks always bring a room to life and FJ & RD Story Antique Clocks has a diverse collection catering for most tastes, amongst which is an English double fusée bronze and ormolu mounted mantel clock by F Baetens, London, c1825, priced at £5,950 and a fine quality figured walnut longcase clock by William Allam of London, c1750, £12,000. Examples of Allam’s work were exhibited at the Guildhall Museum in London, founded in 1826.

Dating back around 70 million years, the oldest piece to be found at the fair is a dinosaur egg, measuring around 15cm, £550 from antiquities dealer Odyssey. This impressive fossilised egg is from a Therizinosaurus, which roamed the earth during the late Cretaceous period.

Visit Harewood House in Yorkshire to enjoy antiques

Pair of Staffordshire pottery cockerels, 12” high, c1870, POA from Carolyn Stoddart-Scott

Jack Shaw & Co returns with a fine collection of silver, including a pair of French claret jugs by the renowned Parisian silversmith Emile Puiforcat, c1880, £4,500 and a pair of old Sheffield plate wine coolers, c1825, £3,500.  Ceramics specialist, Carolyn Stoddart-Scott always has a decorative mix of fine English and Continental pieces. Amongst the porcelain she is bringing is a pair of puce mark Derby plates with yellow border and sprig decoration, c1800, and a pair of 12 inch tall pottery cockerels, c1870, both POA. JA Yarwood Antiques is also showing a collection of fine quality Japanese items, including a late Edo – early Meiji period hand carved ivory netsuke showing Ashinaga and Tenaga, signed, Japan, c1860, £3,785.

Antiques fair ticket holders gain complimentary access to Harewood’s grounds, gardens and Below Stairs.  For £5 each, (saving £11.50 on an Adult Freedom ticket) fair visitors can upgrade to see the State Rooms and current exhibitions marking the 300th anniversary of Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown’s birth. Harewood House’s exhibitions and activities include The Art of Landscape which presents a full and fresh assessment of the cultural influence of the ‘Capability’ Brown design at Harewood.  Great Capabilities; a celebration of “Capability” Brown at Harewood takes place from 4 to 12 June, celebrating the achievements of the great landscape designer at Harewood in a series of walks, talks and exhibitions.

For those seeking advice about the care of antique furniture, look no further than T L Phelps Fine Furniture Restoration, the north Yorkshire based company that has been responsible for working on some of the Chippendale furniture and a dining table in Harewood House in the past. A current project includes tidying up the damaged polish on a grand sized dining table from a royal household, made by Holland & Sons, as well as some matching chairs and side tables.

Even the caterers, The Yorkshire Party Company, who are providing light refreshments in The Marquee, have been inspired by the royal birthday and ‘Capability’ Brown’s anniversary year. The fair is supported by Knight Frank, Masons Yorkshire Gin and Wilson Mitchell & Co. Ltd, senior partner practice of St. James’s Place Wealth Management.

Read more about the Antiques Fair 

Creating an Exhibition

Visit Yorkshire to see exhibitions

I sometimes wonder if people question how an exhibition appears on the walls and what was involved in getting it there. Is it enough just to enjoy (hopefully!) what people see in front of them?

Here at Harewood, we have a series of exhibition spaces where we display works of art. From a dedicated contemporary gallery to the grounds themselves, there are wonderful places throughout which lend themselves to exhibitions.

Creating exhibitions requires a team effort. Working together, we look at the year as a whole to see what might trigger a particular response. Is there a special anniversary or a national ‘year of’ that Harewood could respond to? Do we have items in our collection that could be part of the programme?

The House, the collection, and the landscape are incredibly rich sources of material; the right theme can provide the ideal opportunity to display a particular object or tell a story. Artworks, furniture, documents and textiles are all considered. However making connections between topics and the collection might not always be obvious. We need to create links between artists and genres to complete our exhibition programme.

Harewood’s link with contemporary art continuously influences our exhibition calendar. Each year, we host exhibitions in the Terrace Gallery, which was the first, dedicated contemporary gallery space in an English country house. Opened in 1989, artists including Antony Gormley and Sir Sidney Nolan have presented works here.

To create a contemporary response to our chosen topic, we begin by researching artists. Which artist’s work offers a connection with our chosen topic? What techniques are they using? Will our audience be challenged?

Once selected, we invite the chosen artist to Harewood so that they can get a feel for the place, meet the team, and begin exploring ideas. It’s a very exciting time! Connecting the chosen topic with the artist’s vision can take several months, and may involve many creative discussions.

Exhibitions using works created by deceased artists are often the most complex. Multiple requests to loan their work are needed, permissions from the artist’s estate, and condition reports on each object may be required.

How the final exhibition is presented forms a significant part of the curatorial process. As the exhibition layout is designed, we discuss the best way to coherently and attractively present the works so that they have the strongest impact. This can include how a work is framed or how an object is displayed.

Whilst preparing the layout, we work with graphic designers to complete any interpretive requirements. Sometimes these can be straightforward with simple panels and titles needed. In other cases, more design work is required to give an exhibition a clear identity.

2016 is the tercentenary of the birth of Lancelot “Capability” Brown.  The Capability Brown Festival is the first-ever nationwide celebration of this eminent landscape designer. Boasting 1000 acres of “Capability” Brown designed landscape, Harewood represents one of his most important designs. The grade 1 listed parkland has remained unchanged since it was created in the late 18th century. With soft, rolling hills and mature, established tree lines, visitors can experience the idyllic, picturesque views “Capability” Brown imagined for Harewood in the 1760s. It is this story which has inspired the 2016 exhibition programme.

Over a year of planning and programming completed. The results of the process are below:

The Art of Landscape and North and South, 25th March – 30th October
Watercolour Rooms

Using artworks from Harewood’s collection, this exhibition shows the unchanged vistas of the “Capability” Brown design. Watercolours by JMW Turner, painted in 1797, can be seen alongside early photographs captured by Roger Fenton in 1860. Watch a film by Simon Warner following the original carriage route created by Brown on horseback. Read more

Look, Touch and Listen
Gardens
Explore Harewood’s landscape with your senses in a self-guided tour of the grounds.

Shade into Shade, 25th March – 24th July
Terrace Gallery

Imaginative photography by Finnish artist, Jorma Puranen provides a contemporary take on the landscape. This exhibition includes images of Harewood’s parkland and the lake. Jorma takes photographs of a reflection rather than the actual subject itself. The result is a mysterious, painterly, shimmering quality which shows the Brownian views in a new way. Read more

Great Capabilities Week, 4th – 12th June
In the landscape
Join one of our expert talks in the landscape and explore unspoiled parkland. Learn, garden, photograph and taste your way through the Grade 1 listed grounds. Read more
Places are limited 

a grove of delight, 30th July – 30th October
Terrace Gallery

Through words and images, the Scottish poet Thomas A. Clark will transform the Terrace Gallery into a grove, a space of quiet, of shade and reflection, set aside from the light and openness of Capability Brown’s landscape garden. Read more

By Nicola Stephenson, Exhibitions and Projects Producer