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Harewood House Sees Visitors Increase Following ITV Victoria Series and Successful Exhibitions

ITV's Victoria filmed at Harewood House

As series 2 of ITV’s blockbuster drama Victoria airs, Harewood House Trust announces increased visitors numbers following the successful Victorian Harewood exhibitions inspired by the production which used Harewood as a key location. The major exhibitions have seen historically accurate costumes from the programme displayed in the house alongside personal objects owned by Queen Victoria.

Jane Marriott, Director of Harewood House Trust said: “2017 has been a fantastic year for Harewood House Trust. As a charity, we have a responsibility to preserve and protect Harewood and its collections; filming is an important revenue stream which helps this work continue.

To capitalise on the Victoria production, we have shaped our season around Harewood’s Victorian history; costumes from Victoria have been on display including the famous coronation gown worn by Jenna Coleman who plays Victoria in the programme. Alongside the stunning costumes, personal items owned by Queen Victoria, Charlotte Canning, Queen Victoria’s lady-in-waiting, and Lady Louisa, 3rd Countess of Harewood, have been displayed adding real authenticity to the exhibitions in the house.”

“The response has been incredibly positive and we have seen visitors to Harewood significantly increase compared to the same period last year.”

Harewood House has been transformed into Buckingham Palace for both series 1 and 2 of the programme. Many of the opulent rooms on the State Floor, the famous kitchens Below Stairs as well as exteriors of the house and parts of the Estate have been used in the production.

Jane Marriott said, “We are looking forward to series 2 and seeing Harewood on screen once again. We hope to see more visitors coming to Harewood before the Victoria costume exhibition and the Victorian Harewood displays close on 29th October.”

Jane Marriott said, “Watch out for our announcement this autumn for our new Christmas season extending our celebration of all things Victorian.”

Harewood House Develops Exciting New Film Tourism Offer

Visit Harewood House to see ITV's Victoria costume

To coincide with English Tourism Week (25th March – 2nd April 2017), Harewood House in Yorkshire will launch an exciting series of exhibitions hoping to capitalise on the increasing demand from visitors to see film and TV locations.

Harewood House was used as a major set for ITV’s blockbuster series ‘Victoria’ and the exhibition, titled Victorian Harewood, will present an impressive collection of costumes from series one, including the iconic Coronation dress worn by actress Jenna Coleman who plays Queen Victoria. Visitors will also be able to see many of the rooms used in the series which transformed Harewood House into Buckingham Palace and Kensington Palace.

‘Victoria’ has been broadcast in over 100 countries around the world, and the impact on Harewood House’s visitor figures will become clear after Harewood opens on 24th March 2017. With series two of ‘Victoria’ currently being filmed at Harewood House, David Lascelles, Earl of Harewood and fourth generation grandson of Queen Victoria, commented:

“There are always new stories to tell about Harewood and the success of ITV’s ‘Victoria’ gives us the chance to bring that era here to life – something we’ve never really done before. It’s great to be able to link a successful TV show with our own history in this way and I hope it will bring new audiences as well as giving something different for our faithful and much valued members.”

As part of Victorian Harewood, personal objects, letters and archive material from Harewood’s collection including Queen Victoria’s writing set, a pocket watch given to Victoria for her birthday from her mother and a rare book of etchings made by Victoria and Albert will be shown.

The exhibition also includes a fascinating, contemporary response by modern-day artists. The Empire Line presents contemporary photography by Gavin Fernandes, using fashion photography to look at narratives of race, culture, history and the Victorian Empire.

In addition, a selection of 21st century re-interpretations of the Victorian bust from artist Kathy Dalwood’s Secret Society series will be displayed in the China Room. Instead of sculpting in clay or stone the busts are made by direct casting from real things and found objects which are collaged together, moulded and cast in plaster.

For more information visit: www.harewood.org

Sebastiano del Piombo, ‘Portrait of a Lady’ Returns to Harewood after 40 years

Visit Harewood in Yorkshire to see renaissance works by Sebastiano-del-Piombo

Sebastiano del Piombo’s ‘Portrait of a Lady’ returns to Harewood House for the first time in over 40 years

About the Artist

The Venetian painter Sebastiano del  Piombo (1485 – 1547) probably trained under Giovanni Bellini and Giorgione. In 1511 he left Venice for Rome, where the High Renaissance was flourishing. His work was influenced initially by Raphael, but he later met and began collaborating with Michelangelo. That partnership is currently the subject of an exhibition at the National Gallery in London – Michelangelo and Sebastiano until 25 June.

About the Lady

The painting most probably represents an idealized Venetian woman. It is closely related to another work in the Museo del Arte de Cataluna, Barcelona, which differs in background details and setting. There are also two other versions closer to the Harewood original, representing St Lucy, with the eyes of the sitter reflected in the cup. The Harewood painting may represent St Lucy but there is no evidence of reflected eyes in the cup here.

It has recently been suggested that the sitter is Vittoria Colonna, a renowned writer and member of the wealthy and powerful Colonna family, shown as Artemesia, a goddess associated with death, being in mourning for her young  husband Ferrante d’Avalos, Marchese of Pescara.  He died from wounds sustained at the Battle of Pavia in 1525.  This battle was one of the most important in Italian history, as Charles V and the Spanish forces overwhelmed the French and captured Francis I, whose portrait attributed to Titian, can be seen in the Gallery at Harewood.

About the Collector

Sebastiano’s paintings were popular in Britain from the early 19th century.  Portrait of a Lady was acquired by Henry George Charles Lascelles, 6th Earl of Harewood, an outstanding collector of Venetian Old Master paintings and drawings in the early 20th century.  His collection was formed predominantly between the years 1917 to 1927, when he was advised by Tancred Borenius, a Finnish art historian.  The Portrait of a Lady, formerly in the collection of the Earl of Elgin of Broomhall in Fife, was an early purchase and was in the possession of Lord Lascelles by 1917, when he had the work conserved. The painting was originally hung at the Lascelles London home, Chesterfield House and, following the sale of that house, was moved to Harewood in the 1930s. By the 1950s, it hung in the Rose Drawing Room

The painting goes on display for the first time in over forty years on 24 March 2017 and has recently been especially conserved.

The National Gallery exhibition opens to the public on 15 March 2017.

Visit Harewood to see Sebastiano del Piombo art

A Great Art Collector: Henry Lascelles; the 6th Earl of Harewood: 14th July – 30th October 2016

The 6th Earl of Harewood was born Henry, Viscount Lascelles in 1882. From an early age, the 6th Earl developed a keen interest in fine art, and as a young man he travelled to Europe on the grand tour. This passion for the arts received a great boost in 1916, when his uncle, the eccentric 2nd Marquis of Clanricarde, died leaving the 6th Earl a considerable fortune of £2,500,000. This enabled the 6th Earl to develop his passion for acquiring art, establishing his reputation as one of the most renowned collectors of his age.

Come to Harewood and enjoy the unique opportunity to discover Renaissance masters which haven’t been exhibited to the public for years!

Visit Harewood in Yorkshire to see rare Renaissance collections

Drawing in charcoal with chalk highlight on blue paper: Samson slaying the Philistine, by Jocopo Robusti, Il Tintoretto, 16th century

Visit Yorkshire to enjoy Renaissance art

Handwritten invoice from Thomas Agnew & Sons requesting payment for purchases made by Viscount Lascelles from August 1917 to June 1919

Creating an Exhibition

Visit Yorkshire to see exhibitions

I sometimes wonder if people question how an exhibition appears on the walls and what was involved in getting it there. Is it enough just to enjoy (hopefully!) what people see in front of them?

Here at Harewood, we have a series of exhibition spaces where we display works of art. From a dedicated contemporary gallery to the grounds themselves, there are wonderful places throughout which lend themselves to exhibitions.

Creating exhibitions requires a team effort. Working together, we look at the year as a whole to see what might trigger a particular response. Is there a special anniversary or a national ‘year of’ that Harewood could respond to? Do we have items in our collection that could be part of the programme?

The House, the collection, and the landscape are incredibly rich sources of material; the right theme can provide the ideal opportunity to display a particular object or tell a story. Artworks, furniture, documents and textiles are all considered. However making connections between topics and the collection might not always be obvious. We need to create links between artists and genres to complete our exhibition programme.

Harewood’s link with contemporary art continuously influences our exhibition calendar. Each year, we host exhibitions in the Terrace Gallery, which was the first, dedicated contemporary gallery space in an English country house. Opened in 1989, artists including Antony Gormley and Sir Sidney Nolan have presented works here.

To create a contemporary response to our chosen topic, we begin by researching artists. Which artist’s work offers a connection with our chosen topic? What techniques are they using? Will our audience be challenged?

Once selected, we invite the chosen artist to Harewood so that they can get a feel for the place, meet the team, and begin exploring ideas. It’s a very exciting time! Connecting the chosen topic with the artist’s vision can take several months, and may involve many creative discussions.

Exhibitions using works created by deceased artists are often the most complex. Multiple requests to loan their work are needed, permissions from the artist’s estate, and condition reports on each object may be required.

How the final exhibition is presented forms a significant part of the curatorial process. As the exhibition layout is designed, we discuss the best way to coherently and attractively present the works so that they have the strongest impact. This can include how a work is framed or how an object is displayed.

Whilst preparing the layout, we work with graphic designers to complete any interpretive requirements. Sometimes these can be straightforward with simple panels and titles needed. In other cases, more design work is required to give an exhibition a clear identity.

2016 is the tercentenary of the birth of Lancelot “Capability” Brown.  The Capability Brown Festival is the first-ever nationwide celebration of this eminent landscape designer. Boasting 1000 acres of “Capability” Brown designed landscape, Harewood represents one of his most important designs. The grade 1 listed parkland has remained unchanged since it was created in the late 18th century. With soft, rolling hills and mature, established tree lines, visitors can experience the idyllic, picturesque views “Capability” Brown imagined for Harewood in the 1760s. It is this story which has inspired the 2016 exhibition programme.

Over a year of planning and programming completed. The results of the process are below:

The Art of Landscape and North and South, 25th March – 30th October
Watercolour Rooms

Using artworks from Harewood’s collection, this exhibition shows the unchanged vistas of the “Capability” Brown design. Watercolours by JMW Turner, painted in 1797, can be seen alongside early photographs captured by Roger Fenton in 1860. Watch a film by Simon Warner following the original carriage route created by Brown on horseback. Read more

Look, Touch and Listen
Gardens
Explore Harewood’s landscape with your senses in a self-guided tour of the grounds.

Shade into Shade, 25th March – 24th July
Terrace Gallery

Imaginative photography by Finnish artist, Jorma Puranen provides a contemporary take on the landscape. This exhibition includes images of Harewood’s parkland and the lake. Jorma takes photographs of a reflection rather than the actual subject itself. The result is a mysterious, painterly, shimmering quality which shows the Brownian views in a new way. Read more

Great Capabilities Week, 4th – 12th June
In the landscape
Join one of our expert talks in the landscape and explore unspoiled parkland. Learn, garden, photograph and taste your way through the Grade 1 listed grounds. Read more
Places are limited 

a grove of delight, 30th July – 30th October
Terrace Gallery

Through words and images, the Scottish poet Thomas A. Clark will transform the Terrace Gallery into a grove, a space of quiet, of shade and reflection, set aside from the light and openness of Capability Brown’s landscape garden. Read more

By Nicola Stephenson, Exhibitions and Projects Producer